Deep Throat

[from CNSNews.com] Editor Susan Jones of CNS News passing on reporting from the Washington Post and other sources, saying Mark Felt, who has declared himself to be “Deep Throat” of the Watergate Scandal, has not acted out of concern for the truth primarily. In the 70s, The Post suggests Felt was the natural successor to FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, but he was passed over for an outsider. This year, Vanity Fair suggests money for the family was the motivation.

Why did attorney John O’Connor tell Mark Felt’s story to Vanity Fair instead of the Washington Post? Ben Bradlee, the newspaper’s former executive editor, offered his speculation Wednesday morning. “It’s up to him,” Bradlee told a reporter in response to the question. “I suspect the (Vanity Fair) ‘quid’ was bigger than any ‘quo’ we could have given him.””

The family may be hoping for a book deal. Felt’s daughter told Vanity Fair her thinking: “Bob Woodward’s going to get all the glory for this (revealing Deep Throat’s identity), but we could make at least enough money to pay some bills, like the debt I’ve run up for the kids’ education.”

A couple high-profile officials from that time believe Felt mishandled his information. This morning, Henry Kissinger said, “My own view is that if you’re in a high government position or any government position and you disagree with the government, you ought to resign, and if you think you have seen a criminal act, you ought to go to the prosecutor.”

He said he believes Felt to be “troubled” and that Nixon’s appointment of an outsider to directed the FBI “must have jarred the established institution.”

Former presidential counselor Chuck Colson said Felt should have gone to the FBI Director with his charge of obstruction, and if nothing came of it, he should have resigned in order to bring attention to the crime. Colson had always considered Felt to be a “consummate professional,” but confiding in the Washington Post was breaking “the confidence of the president of the United States.”

Pat Buchanan, who was an advisor and speechwriter for President Nixon, put a little perspective on Felt’s breach of confidence. He said J. Edgar Hoover “knew all of the lurid secrets of Jack Kennedy, but thank God, he didn’t go out and give them to the Chicago Tribune. That would have been an awful thing to do.” Talking to NBC’s Matt Lauer, Buchanan said, “As Chuck says, the FBI knows every secret almost about everybody they’ve ever investigated… if you want the FBI putting this material out on the record when somebody wants to – what kind of country do you want?”

About the author

Jeff Grim

Jeff Grim has been a reader all of his life. He has had a particular interest in military history, any war at any time. His fascination with military history has brought him to an interest in historical fiction where the history comes alive with fictitious heroes and villains. Recently, Jeff has become interested in historical mysteries set in various time periods.

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