Potential Father's Day Gift Books

Being a father the normal process would be for others to offer recommendations on books to buy me.  But as I am reading a couple of books that seem like potential Father’s Day gifts I figured I would share.  (The idea was to have read them by Father’s Day, but I might miss the mark)

–> Seeing how this is US Open week, what better book to get the golf loving father than Are You Kidding Me? by Rocco Mediate and John Feinstein:

Description

June 2008’s US Open produced one of the most unexpected and dramatic showdowns in golf history. Day after day the invincible Tiger Woods was challenged by Rocco Mediate, a respected journeyman. On Sunday, both ended play tied at par, forcing a playoff. Defying expectations, Mediate played Woods to yet another tie, losing only after forcing a sudden-death showdown.

Through it all, Rocco Mediate emerged as one of the most likable, open, and fascinating golfers. In ARE YOU KIDDING ME?, he tells the full story of these five life-changing days. With John Feinstein, whose insider knowledge of the golf world is unparalleled, Mediate relives one of sport’s greatest feats, how one man overcame every obstacle to challenge the game’s finest.

I am reading it this week in anticipation of another great tournament – this time at Bethpage Black with Tiger Woods looking healthy and dominant again.

A couple more below.

–> On totally different subject, I have been slowly working my way through The Maxims of Manhood: 100 Rules Every Real Man Must Live By by Jeff Wilser:

Description

Your dog must be larger than a toaster. Tip well. Never use the word “blossom.” Outperform the GPS. Know how to chug a beer (and know that you shouldn’t). Always hold the door. Never use emoticons.

These are The Maxims of Manhood. They cover every aspect of life: women, sports, sex, the office, family, entertainment, fashion, fitness, and more women. Some of these you’d expect. Some you wouldn’t, as they usher in a modern code of masculinity (Your favorite book may not be The Da Vinci Code). In a series of 100 essays, the rules are analyzed, explained, vigorously defended and openly mocked. Every rule has an authorized exception. Except the ones that don’t.

This book might not be for you. It’s only intended for people who fall into one of these seven buckets: 1) you are a man; 2) you will become a man; 3) you were once a man; 4) you are related to a man; 5) you are dating or have married a man; 6) you think that in the future, perhaps, you will date or marry a man; 7) you know, or think that at some point you will know–whether casually or formally–a man.

So far it is pretty funny.  Includes some vulgarity and un-PC type language, but often clever and occasionally laugh out loud funny.

–> Along similar lines, but with less sarcasm and a more conservative perspective is The Ultimate Man’s Survival Guide by Frank Miniter:

Description

The Upper East Side metrosexual may be good at cocktail chat, but a real man knows how to fight off alligators, create a tourniquet out of a t-shirt, and rescue a drowning person. Frank Miniter’s The Ultimate Man’s Survival Guide shows men how to do all of these and more, including:

* how to fight off a bear
* how to set a dislocated joint
* how to pick the perfect cigar and bottle of wine

Presented in seven sections–survivor, provider, athlete, hero, romantic, cultured man, and philosopher–Miniter teaches guys the skills, attitudes, and philosophies they need to be the ultimate man. Clearly written and packed with real-life anecdotes, as well as line-drawings and how-to illustrations, The Ultimate Man’s Survival Guide teaches men that any guy can be the ultimate man whether he is rescuing a lost hiker, plucking a child from a swift stream, or standing up against injustice.

I will offer full fledged reviews when I finish the above books.  But in the meantime check them out if you are looking for a gift for dad.

If you have books to recommend for Father’s Day, leave a comment or send a link to your post.

About the author

Kevin Holtsberry

I work in communications and public affairs. I try to squeeze in as much reading as I can while still spending time with my wife and two kids (and cheering on the Pittsburgh Steelers and Michigan Wolverines during football season - oh, and watching golf too).

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2 Comments

  • Here's another sports-related book, like the one you have about golf. It's a very fun, and interesting, book about big sports errors, What Were They Thinking? The Brainless Blunders that Changed Sports History. Kyle Garlett has assembled scads of great stories about what really happened during the sports blunders that made you tear your hair out, or at least wonder about what was going on. I like the Bill Buckner story from the 1986 World Series — the author takes the position Buckner is NOT to blame, by the way. And if you think you won't ever use math in the real world, and you're playing golf on Sunday with a chance to win the Masters, think again.

    This book is great for both rabid and casual fans, and non-fans, too.

  • Here's another sports-related book, like the one you have about golf. It's a very fun, and interesting, book about big sports errors, What Were They Thinking? The Brainless Blunders that Changed Sports History. Kyle Garlett has assembled scads of great stories about what really happened during the sports blunders that made you tear your hair out, or at least wonder about what was going on. I like the Bill Buckner story from the 1986 World Series — the author takes the position Buckner is NOT to blame, by the way. And if you think you won't ever use math in the real world, and you're playing golf on Sunday with a chance to win the Masters, think again.

    This book is great for both rabid and casual fans, and non-fans, too.

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