Countdown to Pearl Harbor: The Twelve Days to the Attack by Steve Twomey

In Countdown to Pearl Harbor Steve Twomey revisits the reasons why the Americans were so caught off-guard by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Still to this day it astounds me at the incompetence and arrogance of America’s leaders as Japan prepared for war against the United States. Twomey does a masterful job of bringing this incompetence and arrogance into blindingly bright light. He uses countless examples of the lackadaisical attitude of officers at Pearl Harbor that led to the...

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Their Finest by Lissa Evans

Evans opens a door into the film industry (at least the one back in the 1940s) with her portrayals of actors and those behind the scenes. Her descriptions are full of detail not only of movie making, but also of life in a war-torn city. The plot is light. It has a few twists that keeps the reader interested. A good, quick read.

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The Sun King Conspiracy by Yves Jego and Denis Lepee

The Sun King Conspiracy by Yves Jego and Denis Lepee is an intriguing look at the time of Louis XIV of France. Here is a brief summary of the book: Cardinal Mazarin, the Chief Minister who has governed throughout King Louis’ early years, lies dying. As a fierce power struggle develops to succeed him, a religious brotherhood, guardian of a centuries-old secret, also sees its chance to influence events. Gabriel de Pontbriand, an aspiring actor employed as secretary to Moliere, becomes...

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The Wicked City by Beatriz Williams

Although Williams' novels have a bit more sex than I like (any mention of it is a bit more than my preference not because of prudishness, but I like action more than sexual relationships), she spins an awesome story. The story is believable even if it has a dash of the supernatural. It is not boring or predictable.

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The Wars of the Roosevelts by William J. Mann

A masterpiece on one of America's most powerful political families in the first half of the Twentieth Century, the Roosevelts. The Wars of the Roosevelts is a deep look at Presidents Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt, their spouses, siblings, and children which shows the cut-throat nature of the family as each person (Theodore, Franklin, and Eleanor) rose in political power.

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The Great and the Good by Michel Deon

The book is intriguing because it almost feels like a classic. A classic in the sense that it captures the time period perfectly - 1950's America as an industrial and commercial giant. In contrast, it is perplexing due to the structure of the book. It is a bit tedious at times. Tedious in the organization - paragraphs go on for several pages and the dialogue is a bit hard to follow in certain parts.

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