The Wicked City by Beatriz Williams

Although Williams' novels have a bit more sex than I like (any mention of it is a bit more than my preference not because of prudishness, but I like action more than sexual relationships), she spins an awesome story. The story is believable even if it has a dash of the supernatural. It is not boring or predictable.

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The Wars of the Roosevelts by William J. Mann

A masterpiece on one of America's most powerful political families in the first half of the Twentieth Century, the Roosevelts. The Wars of the Roosevelts is a deep look at Presidents Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt, their spouses, siblings, and children which shows the cut-throat nature of the family as each person (Theodore, Franklin, and Eleanor) rose in political power.

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The Great and the Good by Michel Deon

The book is intriguing because it almost feels like a classic. A classic in the sense that it captures the time period perfectly - 1950's America as an industrial and commercial giant. In contrast, it is perplexing due to the structure of the book. It is a bit tedious at times. Tedious in the organization - paragraphs go on for several pages and the dialogue is a bit hard to follow in certain parts.

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PhDeath: The Puzzler Murders by James Carse

PhDeath is a fast-paced thriller set in a major university in a major city on a square. The faculty finds itself in deadly intellectual combat with the anonymous Puzzler. Along with teams of US Military Intelligence and the city's top detective and aided by the Puzzle Master of The New York Times, their collective brains are no match for the Puzzler's perverse talents

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The Swamp Fox by John Oller

Although at first blush the title of John Oller's The Swamp Fox: How Francis Marion Saved the American Revolution seems a bit hyperbolic, but after reading it, I agree. An excellent book that describes the exploits of one of the saviors of the American Revolution in the South.

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