PhDeath: The Puzzler Murders by James Carse

PhDeath is a fast-paced thriller set in a major university in a major city on a square. The faculty finds itself in deadly intellectual combat with the anonymous Puzzler. Along with teams of US Military Intelligence and the city's top detective and aided by the Puzzle Master of The New York Times, their collective brains are no match for the Puzzler's perverse talents

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The Swamp Fox by John Oller

Although at first blush the title of John Oller's The Swamp Fox: How Francis Marion Saved the American Revolution seems a bit hyperbolic, but after reading it, I agree. An excellent book that describes the exploits of one of the saviors of the American Revolution in the South.

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The Gilded Chalet by Padraig Rooney

I will be the first to admit that I am not one of the most well-read book readers. So, when The Gilded Chalet came in the mail, I was not sure what to think. Once I started reading the book, however, I grew to enjoy its excerpts from great Western writers and its history of those writers in Switzerland and the world.

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Pharaoh by Wilbur Smith

Pharaoh Tamose lies mortally wounded. The ancient city of Luxor is surrounded, All seems lost. Taita, advisor to the Pharaoh, prepares for the enemy’s final, fatal push. The ex-slave, now general of Tamose’s armies, is never more ingenious than when all hope is dashed. And this is Egypt’s most desperate hour.

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The Fate of the Tearling by Erika Johansen

Mind-bending and awesome are the words that come to mind after reading this book. Mind-bending in the different turns that the book takes (it goes to very unexpected places) and awesome in finding out the fate of different characters and the events that led to their destination.

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The Eskimo Solution by Pascal Garnier

I usually stray away from noir-themed books due to their very nature, but this book intrigued me based on the plot. Like all noir novels, this is a bleak and depressing story. Despite the very dark nature, Garnier writes beautifully. He captures the scenes in the book perfectly by allowing the reader easily visualize the scenes.

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