The Perfect Pass by S. C. Gwynne

Mumme is tragically unappreciated by the average football fan and the history of how pass first offense, and its offshoots, came to dominate football is not well know. Fans of football and its history will enjoy reading about how Mumme overcame the odds and had a huge impact on the game they love.

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How William F. Buckley Put Liberal America on The Firing Line

For some odd reason I had not really listened to the Federalist Radio Hour until just recently.  This despite being a huge fan of The Transom and all things Ben Domenech. But I am now tuning in on a regular basis.  He has had some fascinating authors on for extended conversations and it is refreshing in today’s soundbite world. Speaking of that, I just finished listening to his conversation with Heather Hendershot, professor of film and media at MIT, and the author of the new book...

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The Little Old Lady Who Broke All The Rules by Catharina Ingelman-Sundberg

A Swedish novel, The Little Old Lady Who Broke All The Rules by Catharina Ingelman-Sundberg, is a charming story of a group of senior citizens stuck in a nursing home. The premise of the book is that the leader of the group, Martha, is tired of nursing home life and does not want to end her days in a nursing home whose management has gotten progressively more stingy. So, she hatches a plan with four of her fellow residents, to “break out” of the home and commit a robbery...

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The Angel: The Egyptian Spy Who Saved Israel by Uri Bar-Joseph

The Angel: The Egyptian Spy Who Saved Israel by Uri Bar-Joseph is an excellent book about Ashraf Marwan, son-in-law to late Egyptian president Gamal Nasser. Here is a synopsis of the book from the publisher: A riveting feat of research and reportage, The Angel explores one of the twentieth century’s most compelling spy stories: the sensational life and suspicious death of Ashraf Marwan, a top-level Egyptian official who secretly worked for Israel’s Mossad. As the son-in-law of Egyptian...

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The New Trail of Tears by Naomi Schaefer Riley

The New Trail of Tears is an important and yet depressing book. It details the myriad problems besetting American Indians today. These include: a lack of economic opportunity, massive dysfunction and family breakdown and tribal and Washington leaders unwilling to face the reality or do anything about it except propose more money and more government (neither of which has worked). Naomi Schaefer Riley details the plight of the American Indian by highlighting the structural, legal, economic, and...

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Last Stand at Khe Sanh: The U.S. Marines’ Finest Hour in Vietnam by Gregg Jones

The Vietnam War – one of the subjects that lured me into exploring and loving history. I can never read enough about this war – everything from the failed strategy to the individual acts of valor on the battlefield. Gregg Jones takes his turn at documenting the events surrounding the siege of Khe Sanh in Last Stand at Khe Sanh: The U.S. Marines’ Finest Hour in Vietnam. The book generally covers the fighting between the Marines and the North Vietnamese Army from January until...

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The Weaver Fish by Robert Edeson

The Weaver Fish by Robert Edeson is a unique and confounding work of fiction. It is fascinating and frustrating. Here is a bit about the book: Cambridge linguist Edvard Tøssentern, presumed dead, reappears after a balloon crash. When he staggers in from a remote swamp, gravely ill and swollen beyond recognition, his colleagues at the research station are overjoyed. But Edvard’s discovery about a rare giant bird throws them all into the path of an international crime ring. The Weaver Fish is...

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Adam’s Rib by Antonio Manzini

The second book of the Rocco Schiavone Mystery series by Antonio Manzini, Adam’s Rib, is just as good as the first – Black Run. Here are the basics to the plot: Six months after being exiled from his beloved Rome, Deputy Police Chief Rocco Schiavone has settled into a routine in the cold, quiet, chronically backward alpine town of Aosta: an espresso at home, breakfast in the piazza, and a morning joint in his office. A little self-medication helps Rocco deal with the morons that...

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