The Great and the Good by Michel Deon

The book is intriguing because it almost feels like a classic. A classic in the sense that it captures the time period perfectly - 1950's America as an industrial and commercial giant. In contrast, it is perplexing due to the structure of the book. It is a bit tedious at times. Tedious in the organization - paragraphs go on for several pages and the dialogue is a bit hard to follow in certain parts.

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PhDeath: The Puzzler Murders by James Carse

PhDeath is a fast-paced thriller set in a major university in a major city on a square. The faculty finds itself in deadly intellectual combat with the anonymous Puzzler. Along with teams of US Military Intelligence and the city's top detective and aided by the Puzzle Master of The New York Times, their collective brains are no match for the Puzzler's perverse talents

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To the Bright Edge of the World by Eowyn Ivey

It moves from the interior thoughts and emotions of its characters to the historic events that surround them, to the interaction of people across social, cultural and language boundaries, all while sucking you into this gripping story of a fantastical expedition and its impact on both the future and the lives of a young marriage.

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Tracking the Beast by Henry Kisor

What Kisor offers is a police procedural/mystery with an interesting hook and the people, history and culture of the Upper Peninsula as a setting and important background. Having gotten to know Steve Martinez and his world it is easy reading to slip back into that world as he tackles the latest mystery.

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The Eskimo Solution by Pascal Garnier

I usually stray away from noir-themed books due to their very nature, but this book intrigued me based on the plot. Like all noir novels, this is a bleak and depressing story. Despite the very dark nature, Garnier writes beautifully. He captures the scenes in the book perfectly by allowing the reader easily visualize the scenes.

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