A Man of Genius by Janet Todd

A Man of Genius by Janet Todd is a psychological page turner. It delves deeply into the interactions between a female writer and a genius/borderline madman. Here is brief summary from the publisher: A Man of Genius portrays a psychological journey from safety into obsession and secrecy. It mirrors a physical journey from flamboyant Regency England through a defeated Europe struggling to create a new order after the upheavals of the Napoleonic conquests. Ann, an author of cheap Gothic novels...

Continue reading

Everyone Has Their Reasons by Joseph Matthews

Most people have heard of Kristallnacht (the Night of Broken Glass) - the night when the Nazis targeted Jews throughout Germany - but most people do not know whose actions were used as the pretext for the attacks. Everyone Has Their Reasons is an excellent look at the fictional musings of one of history's little-known assassins whose actions created such chaos.

Continue reading

In the Footsteps of Crazy Horse by Joseph Marshall

It turned out to be a simple but engaging story about a boy struggling with his heritage and how to fit in but also a short history of the life of Crazy Horse. It is basically a history lesson on Crazy Horse based on the oral history of his people but in the form of a story told by a grandfather on a road trip with his grandson. The fitting in part is just a hook to get the story started.

Continue reading

The Empty Throne by Bernard Cornwell

I love these books. I cannot say enough about Cornwell's excellent storytelling and writing - I know I am getting redundant with the posts. He brings the characters to life in the reader's mind. His descriptions of the characters, events, and era are wonderful.

Continue reading

The Pagan Lord by Bernard Cornwell

Although the book gets a bit off-point from the story line, Cornwell anchors it with great descriptions of the major scenes - especially the battles. As I have written before, I have never read another author that can capture the wildly swinging emotions of battle as well as Cornwell. The Pagan Lord is well worth the read.

Continue reading