The Last Battle by Stephen Harding

May 1945. Hitler is dead, and the Third Reich little more than smoking rubble. No GI wants to be the last man killed in action against the Germans. But for cigar-chewing, rough-talking, hard-drinking, hard-charging Captain Jack Lee and his men, there is one more mission: rescue fourteen prominent French prisoners held in an SS-guarded castle high in the Austrian Alps. It’s a dangerous mission, but Lee has help from a decorated German Wehrmacht officer and his men, who voluntarily join the...

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World War II: A Short History by Norman Stone

There have been hundreds of thousands, possibly millions, of pages written about World War II. Every aspect of it has been studied - everything from the types of weapons to the battles to the major personalities to the common soldier or sailor. However, it is a unique person who can describe all of this in a short history.

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World War II: A Short History by Norman Stone

There have been hundreds of thousands, possibly millions, of pages written about World War II. Every aspect of it has been studied - everything from the types of weapons to the battles to the major personalities to the common soldier or sailor. However, it is a unique person who can describe all of this in a short history.

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Pearl Harbor Christmas: A World at War by Stanley Weintraub

Weintraub intricately weaves the avalanche of devastating news of Allied setbacks throughout the world, especially in Asia due to Japanese attacks, with the actions of Roosevelt and Churchill. They not only shared intimate moments in attending Christmas services and eating Christmas dinner together, but also in conducting official business, including one that led to the declaration initiating the United Nations.

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Ronald Reagan by Michael Schaller

If you are looking for a biography that takes Reagan's ideas and policies seriously you will need to look elsewhere. But this short work does nevertheless provide a useful outline of the major issues and events of Reagan's life and gives readers a good place to start. If nothing else it will give conservative readers, or fans of Reagan, a handy outline of the criticisms against the former president and the conservative movement he jump started.

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Ronald Reagan by Michael Schaller

If you are looking for a biography that takes Reagan's ideas and policies seriously you will need to look elsewhere. But this short work does nevertheless provide a useful outline of the major issues and events of Reagan's life and gives readers a good place to start. If nothing else it will give conservative readers, or fans of Reagan, a handy outline of the criticisms against the former president and the conservative movement he jump started.

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Napoleon and the Art of Diplomacy by William Nester

NAPOLEON AND THE ART OF DIPLOMACY: How War and Hubris Determined the Rise and Fall of the French Empire by William Nester is not about Napoleon’s diplomacy as art, but more as brute force. Nester traces Napoleon’s rise to power as a successful general in the mid 1790s to the master of Europe in 1812 and how it all came crashing down in 1814.  Throughout this time, Nester contends that Napoleon wove a web of alliances through treaties and setting relatives on the thrones of various...

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John Quincy Adams by Harlow Giles Unger

In my opinion, John Quincy Adams is one of the most misunderstood men in American history.  Although he was reviled as a President of the United States, he was highly respected as an accomplished statesman and congressman.  Harlow Giles Unger attempts to shed light on America’s sixth President in his book John Quincy Adams. Here is a brief summary of the book from the publisher: Born to Founding Father John Adams, handpicked by President George Washington to serve American interests...

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Gettysburg's Forgotten Cavalry Actions: Farnsworth's Charge, South Cavalry Field, and the Battle of Fairfield, July 3, 1863 by Eric J. Wittenberg

I recently read another book from one of my favorite Civil War authors, Eric Wittenberg.  His latest book, Gettysburg’s Forgotten Cavalry Actions, is a revised edition that he originally wrote in 1998.   He updated the book because of new research, interpretations, and conclusions of the cavalry actions. Wittenberg is my favorite writer not only because he writes about some of the less studied and written areas of the Civil War, but he does it with excellent prose. Here is a synopsis...

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