Knights of the Black and White by Jack Whyte

I have not been reading much lately due to some family concerns, but I did recently begin to read Knights of the Black and White by Jack Whyte. The book is the first in a trilogy on the Templar Knights.

Unfortunately, I can’t give you a review of the book because I stopped about sixty pages into it. I stopped because I can’t agree on what the author is saying through his characters. The one character makes several claims which are completely false: that the apostle Paul was a gentile, not a Jew and that Jesus was not the Son of God in the flesh. At that point, I stopped reading and could not go on in good conscience. I know that this is fiction, but I can’t stomach even a fictional questioning of the beliefs that I know are true.

Before coming to this realization, I was getting a little sick of the book anyway because it was long on thought and short on action. In fact, in some parts, I was downright bored.

In short, I do not recommend this book at all.

About the author

Jeff Grim

Jeff Grim has been a reader all of his life. He has had a particular interest in military history, any war at any time. His fascination with military history has brought him to an interest in historical fiction where the history comes alive with fictitious heroes and villains. Recently, Jeff has become interested in historical mysteries set in various time periods.

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6 Comments

  • I was curious to read a review of this book, as the Templar Knights have always intrigued me. While I am aware the book is fictional, I really don’t know what is true and what is false in the book. I consider all information from the period to be either lie, story, myth, exaggeration, interpretation or belief with some facts thrown in. What alarmed me was your comment “I can’t stomach even a fictional questioning of the beliefs that I know are true”. They are beliefs. You can believe that they are true – you cannot know that they are true. That’s why they are beliefs. Also, to entirely dismiss a viewpoint you don’t believe without even listening to the argument is narrow-minded and dangerous.

  • I was curious to read a review of this book, as the Templar Knights have always intrigued me. While I am aware the book is fictional, I really don’t know what is true and what is false in the book. I consider all information from the period to be either lie, story, myth, exaggeration, interpretation or belief with some facts thrown in. What alarmed me was your comment “I can’t stomach even a fictional questioning of the beliefs that I know are true”. They are beliefs. You can believe that they are true – you cannot know that they are true. That’s why they are beliefs. Also, to entirely dismiss a viewpoint you don’t believe without even listening to the argument is narrow-minded and dangerous.

  • I agree with the first post, and disagree with Dare Devil — who is obviously a liberal who thinks he is more enlightened than others because he is “open minded.” Dare Devil, even sewers have grates on them to filter SOME of the crap out.

    The book is boring; I’m barely able to stay awake while reading it. It is nothing but another attempt to bash Christians, paint them as the bad guys, and declare that Jesus was not the son of God. The author is obviously trying to cash in on “The Devinci Code” craze and paint all Christians as evil and declare thier beliefs as being false. Pass on this book. In fact, I want my money back.

  • Well, I just started the book and am about 100 pages into it. I thought it would be a boring read, as I bought it off a bargain rack, but I am finding it a fascinating read. The characters and period descriptions bring that time to life for me.
    It has captured my attention and I am looking forward to the others of the trilogy.
    BTW, I’m an athiest, so I guess that’s why it’s easier for me to read. Maybe if the others here were more certain of their beliefs, they could withstand the threat that a mere work of fiction presents to them.

  • I found this to be a great book, and while it may be slow paced at some parts, I was still drawn into the book due to the interesting characters and actions which were occuring. And although some may find it disturbing that Christianity is being attacked, I found it to be interesting to be considering new theories on how Christianity really came about.

    And I’m also not a true believer of any religions right now, but I can see why some Christians, most whom have been dedicated to their faith their entire life, would be angered at reading anything that tells them what they’re putting their faith in is false.

    This book is not for the religiously sensitive. It’s only meant to be read by those who want to read an interesting story on how the Templar Knights came to be and what their possible findings were.

  • I found this to be a great book, and while it may be slow paced at some parts, I was still drawn into the book due to the interesting characters and actions which were occuring. And although some may find it disturbing that Christianity is being attacked, I found it to be interesting to be considering new theories on how Christianity really came about.

    And I’m also not a true believer of any religions right now, but I can see why some Christians, most whom have been dedicated to their faith their entire life, would be angered at reading anything that tells them what they’re putting their faith in is false.

    This book is not for the religiously sensitive. It’s only meant to be read by those who want to read an interesting story on how the Templar Knights came to be and what their possible findings were.

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